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and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
. >>> he was the man of the hour, egypt's first democratically elected president. now morsi is being called aa would-be dictator and people are protesting. some are getting killed. massive crowds today at funeral of a protestor who died overnight fatally injured during demonstrations last week against morsi putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it the streets looked like this when millions rose to overthrow "the dictator" hosni mubarak. this it time they accuse him of a naked power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body and emerged saying it his edict was clarified. it remaining unclear. we have the late heest from cairo. this clarification as morsi's advisers call it, it is just a clarification or is morsi faced with protests we've been seeing trying to save face while actually scaling back his decree? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've spoken to the president's office throughout the day, and they say their position is clear that they are not not scaling back on these decrees or making any concessions. they seem to be reshaping and refocusing
president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there wa
president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporte
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo to meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi who is key to brokering any deal. it's her final stop on an emergency round of shuttle diplomacy that also include meetings in israel and the west bank. for the latest nbc's stephanie gosk joins us and ayman mohyeldin. a report of a tel aviv bus explosion. is there any indication that the israelis now are looking at possibly having a short-term truce or want to hold out long er for a longer deal? >> reporter: well, we don't have a truce. there's a lot of talk yesterday that there would be one, and then this morning, today around lunch time this bus attack. and what we know about it so far is that they're saying it's a terrorist attack, it's not a suicide attack. we were down there earlier today and the security officials were very nervous. they were pushing us back. they thought maybe there were more explosives on the bus. it turned out there weren't. this tactic will be very familiar to people in this city and around israel. it was used about a decade ago frequently all over the kcountr during
of cairo. demonstrators are angry over president mohammed morsi's decision to increase his power. morsi stripped powers from judges to overturn any of his decrees. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. we had hopeful seen the protests in the capital. are they spreading now? >> reporter: it looks like it, ramdi. a number of protesters trying to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood. that's when they say the muslim brotherhood fought them back, and that's when you had clashes between the two sides. a number of people injured and arrested there. also, reports of demonstrations south of cairo, but the heart of these demonstrations continues to be here, tahrir square. we're going to give you a live look of what things look like right now. a few thousand people there. many of chem with their tents pitched. these are people who represent the liberal factions, the youth rights, the women's rights groups, the secularists here, and when you talk to them, they say they're determined to stay here until mr. morsi, the president, heeds their call. they're the peaceful protesters. at times
holding, but the ensuing power grab by egyptian president mohamed morsi has set off a new firestorm across egypt. we'll have the latest on that. then we'll take our annual turn to books. we'll talk about presidents past and present with the legendary bob woodward, whose latest is "the price of politics." historian doris kearns goodwin's "team of rivals" is the basis for the new "lincoln" movie. former "newsweek" editor evan thomas is the author of "ike's bluff." and jon meacham's new book is "thomas jefferson: the art of power." for fun, we'll explore the darker side of fiction with gillian flynn, author of the big bestseller, "gone girl." mystery writer david baldacci, whose new one is forgotten. david baldacci, author of "the expats," and then there is alex stone, whose "fooling houdini" tells how he chose magic over physics, and, yes, he fooled us and he'll fool you, too. how did you do that? we were all about books this morning, just like another washington shopper this weekend. >> we're going to get those. >> okay. >> schieffer: because this is "face the nation." captioning spo
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell. they had evacuated some of the area about an hour before that explosion. >>> superstorm sandy has now cost new
anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are protesting morsi's decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas, we will have more on this story at the bottom of the hour. and an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters before noon, a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people in the hospital, construction workers were among the few in the building because it's a holiday weekend. a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings. a camera captured the moment of the blast. mostly emergency workers were injured. they were called to the scene because of reports of the gas smell. they evacuated most of the area an hour before the explosion. superstorm sandy is at $29 billion at cost. governor chris christie said that the final total will only be known after taking into account next summer's tourist season. it was said this that they would ask the federal government for $30 bi
erupt in egypt. thousands demonstrating against a controversial grab for power by mohammed morsi. many saying he's acting like a modern day pharaoh. a big republican turns his back on the grover norquist tax pledge. is the gop preparing to give in to the president? is and thousands of people packing into stores today. watch your wallet. we'll tell you how the shopping season is really adding up. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm tom foreman. egypt erupts. thousands of angry egyptians have been protesting in opposition to a controversial power grabby egypt's president. at least 80 people have been injured and one killed in clashes with police who fired tear gas into the crowds. the unrest began after he issued a series of orders which allow him to run the country unchecked until a new constitution is written. morsi says his actions are meant to speed up reform and achieve political and social stability. >> translator: i have said beforened i repeat again, that i would never use a legislation against individuals, parties, men, women or muslims or christians for personal ga
trouble. those were chants of down with president morsi, down with president morsi. we're now starting to see these protests and clashes take place in cities outside of cairo. in the northern city, the first fatality of these protests. according to the muslim brotherhood, 15-year-old islam massoud was killed when anti-morsi protesters attacked the brotherhood's offices there. massoud hit in the head with a club and pronounced dead before he arrived at the hospital. this is some of the violence taking place. let's go to tahrir square shall things are a little more peaceful. things much calmer here where you have a few thousand people gathered here. about 40 tents, very much reminiscent of the 2011 egyptian revolution. you have food stands, people selling tea. here is a tea stand right here. lots of people talking politics. if you look at these groups here, these are all people that are debating their political positions and demanding that mr. morsi rescind his controversial decre decrees. >> to start with i want these decrees to be withdrawn and secondly, i would hope he starts to liste
strong-man presidency under hosni mubarak. many people today say say president morsi is creating for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few
to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do wh
mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
, egypt newly elected president mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping powellers to give him oversight of any kind and says it's necessary to push through much-needed reforms but they responded with violent protests. this is something that is controversial. people say we have opineed the arab spring but the democracy is thrown aside. >> eric: mohammed morsi before the peace treaty or the cease-fire they came to agree on, before it seemed like he was going to side with hamas, with the palestinians. somehow he came through and came through, first of all, the most important thing he did is declared that the egypt israeli peace treaty or treaty in effect and strong. that really told the world that egypt is going to continue to be a good ally. he is getting pushback from his people because he declared himself the czar or pharaoh or whatever once in power. but for me, egypt is the most important piece of the pozle in the middle east -- pozle in the middle east. >> dana: this really saddened me. people in egypt, those who participated in the arab spring fought for self-determination. they wan
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it started out to be mistrustful of him but warming up to him the more he worked with the guy and frankly the mor
leader this morning and will meet with president morsi later today. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace dale. his muslim brotherhood is close to hamas. a hamas spokesman is quoted in one report saying we hold absolutely no hope of hillary clinton helping to resolve this conflict. >> susan mcginnis in washington this morning. thank you so much. as we reported egypt is expected to play a key role in brokering a truce and trying to maintain it. clarissa ward reports from caro this morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> we were expecting some type of announcement last night regarding a cease-fire. what happened? >> reporter: that's the million dollar question. everyone here in egypt was expecting for president morsi to make an announcement last night. they schedule ad time 9:00 p.m. local. the english language newspaper here has the headline as israel and gaza agree on a cease-fire. that's the level of confidence here that p
now. demonstrators are back spending the night in tahrir square. president mohamed morsi announced sweeping new powers for himself. ordering egyptian court not to overturn any decree or law issued since he took office. as the crowds gather there's a growing unease over what could happen next. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against egyptian president mohamed morrissey not the big numbers that we saw on friday but certainly still a lot of people out here, lots of food stands, about 30 tents, which is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it's not clear how long they will day here. when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning avenue era for a tyrant. >> he's saying that nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the new system out of the scene. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions posed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course a number of his decrees seem to weaken the judiciary. t
against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed in that attack, as many as 16 people wounded, harris. >> harris: it looks much different than last night. much more active at this hour. tell me this, i know that mohammed morsi is planning to meet tomorrow with
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
clinton heads to ramala and to meet with president morsi. burning question, a truce or a ground war? >> no country would tolerate rocket attacks against its cities and civilians. israel can't tolerate such a thing. >> i just got off the phone with the israeli ambassador to washington, michael orrin and he says right now, there is no agreement to a cease-fire in israel by the israelis in the gaza strip. >> we heard the escalation and we are hoping for restoration of calm and hoping for complications. >> i strongly caution against these ground operations. >> president obama asked me to come here with a clear message, america's commitment to israel is unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. >> i can tell you the future of diplomacy here still remains very uncertain. what i can tell you for sure is that this air war did intensity. today alone. they fired more than 150 rockets into israel. >> it's a long term solution can be put in place through diplomatic means than israel would be a willing partner to such a solution. a stronger military
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
tension in egypt this morning, among opponents of that country's president, mohamed morsi. things started getting rough on the streets of cairo, with protesters hurling molotov cocktails at police. they are seething about morsi's powers of placing himself beyond judicial review. a massive demonstration by morsi's opponent is planned for today. >>> we wanted you to check this out. from australia, early this morning. look at that. a crane, high above the streets of sydney caught fire. and then, the crane's arm falls on the roof of a nearby building. the rain operator escaped down a loader. no one was injured. the site was closed for a time. two weeks ago, concerns that diesel was leaking from the crane. the crane's owner also owns the crane in new york that collapsed during hurricane sandy. >> interesting there. >>> and speaking of sandy, one month after the month monster s the financial toll keeps growing. andrew cuomo says the repair for the state and new york city will top $32 billion. and the fallout continues at lipa, the long island utility company that's under fire for its slow respo
morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the leaders of hamas came out thanked the palestinian people for the steadfast support. they ce
senators are threatening to with hold that. is that our leverage? >> morsi stepped up to the plate to fulfill the role of a peacemaker. for many observing this, that's a welcome geopolitical event but it's also a surprise. but let's not kid ourselves. morsi's motivations are as you suggest. we provide him billions in aid. he needs that money. he wants a relationship with the united states. at the same time he has an audience in egypt that clearly is backing hamas in this event and is anti-israel and he has to cater to both. gregg: general jack keane, great to see you. heather: an amazing athletic performance smashing a 58-year-old ncaa basketball touring record. jack taylor scoring 138 points. his home team scored 179 points. jack taylor join us live to talk a little bit more about this amazing feat. jack, i have got to ask you, how in the world did you do this? >> coming into the game i hadn't been shooting well so far this season. so my teammates and coaches wanted to get me going offensively. they made a concerted effort to give me more shots. >> you kind of had an off weekend a
at these pictures. cairo, egypt. thousands of people chanting. morsi, the president of that country, recently the stowed absolute powers among himself. about 60,000 people in the square. numbers reportedly growing. those pictures speaking for themselves. connell: day five out of those protests. right now, let's make you a little money. charles payne. dagen: what do you got? charles: i am driving down 151st street, a gigantic line of people all the way down the block. they were at the house of hoops. this is the most amazing sneaker store you have ever seen in your life. it turns out, footlocker owns it. this morning, goldman sachs put a pot on footlocker. i just wanted to reiterate it, they also have a woman's sneaker store. connell: whatever the newest sneaker was, i think it faded for a while, but now it is back. charles: my son is not into sports, but he knows these sneakers. when the new ones come out, he will let me know. just five minutes ago they were sold out on ebay. first of all, i am not going to get you these sneakers, your grades are not good enough and they cost too much. i do n
with mahmoud abbas and president morsi in israel. what are you hearing about the talks with netanyahu? >> they met about two hours with netanyahu, the defense minister, foreign minister, national security team. they spent two hours, the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position of all issues. she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on, she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now throughout the day, there is speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire. israelis downplaying the possibility. saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. no agreement, and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling of southern israel today by hamas and an intelligence fiction of israeli attacks in gaza, witnessed by what happened to you guys what you saw over the past hour or two in gaza city. the negotiations will continue tomorrow, hillary clinton as you point out, going to ramallah to meet with palestinian authority leaders a
clinton can pressure hamas and can be persuaded by mohamed morsi her chances are pretty good. if she cannot, then i think this will be another round of fighting, potentially even a ground war. i don't think israel wants a ground war. i don't think hamas would mind a ground war. a much more bloody -- would get involved. not the egyptian government, the egyptian people would start streaming in here. the arab media that was so influential in bringing down a arab dictatorships here would go into a state of -- that would benefit hamas. so i think it really depends on how much influence hillary clinton can have over morsi and how much influence morsi can have because even though this area here is being pounded militarily and there was the heaviest air strikes tonight that we have seen thus far, hamas feels -- >> richard engel, live from gaza. thank you. thank you for staying up in the middle of the night. stay safe. >>> thinking about the leverage here that the american government has, we all judge our diplomacy of our own government based on what outcome they are able to achieve, but in a
is morsi. let's begin with you. what is happening or not happening now? >> reporter: it's such a difference to what we were going through just 24 hours ago when the streets were completely deserted. we were seeing out going rockets and feeling many more incoming rounds. right now the streets are bustling with activity. people out and about. we did see those celebrations beginning very shortly after the cease-fire was announced. there was another gathering at midday today. people calling this a victory on the one hand for hamas. others really out just for the pure simple fact that now they can go out without fear of being caught up in the violence. many are under no illusion this is a long lasting solution. >> do people in gau sau feel like israel will honor the agreement and that this truce will hold. >> reporter: there's no trust between their history. something of a test period to s see. it's currently negotiated in egypt right now with egypt continuing. the next phase is going to be whether or not the various restrictions on movements across the border. the israelis have said they will c
for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, secularists, moderates. all have banded together in a show of force, in a show of opposition, against mr. morsi. of course, all of these protests started last thursday when he announced these particular decrees.
, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was leaning towards accepting this draft proposal sent by hamas via the egyptian government. so once it was c
power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks a
, where protests have erupted over president mohamed morsi's decree expanding his power. jim is in cairo. good morning. >> reporter: almost two years after their revolution, egyptians seem more divided than ever. after many hear their elected leader has driven the wedge deeper and wider. at dawn, there were more tents and protesters around tahrir square, but that didn't stop clashes with police, where protesters blocked traffic defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. >> translator: we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved. >> reporter: morsi told his supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast track a new constitution being written by a mostly islamist assembly, after which he said he'd give up those powers. yes, he might be a dictator for the time being, but these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament, he said. but the decrees have triggered protests and riots across the nation. dozens were injured in alexandria when angry youth s
yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us. steve, what's it looking like over there? >> it's looking pretty good. i haven't even started my holiday season shopping. i'll leave that right till the last moment. what is really fascinating is every single survey i've been reading about the whole thanksgiving holiday weekend has been positive about spending in the u.s. why is it so important? it's important because 70% of the u.s. economy is centered around consume
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
. >>> in the streets of egypt today, scenes just like this one. two sides clashing over president mohamed morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. the violent protests played out behind closed doors, morsi met with egypt's top judges to explain his move. these are the same judges who are now banned from overturning any decision he makes until a new constitution is finalized. >>> israel, a country in the midst of very fragile cease-fire with hamas, and now also its own political upheaval, long time israeli defense minister ehud barak making the surprise announcement he's quitting. he says he wants to spend more time with his family and make room for new political figures. here he was. >> translator: i feel it is important that other people should take leading positions in israel. change is in the positions of power is a good thing. there are many ways to contribute to society and the country. and not necessarily through politics. >> barak says he will see out his term, staying on as defense minister until a new cabinet is formed next january. barak played a cruel role as a key oppo
president of egypt, be president morsi, hillary clinton announcing it with the foreign minister there. joining me michael orrin, israel's ambassador to the united states. we anticipate the prime minister is going to be speaking in jerusalem very shortly. let's find out what do you know is in the cease-fire? is there an agreement, for instance, for the hamas in gaza to stop firing rockets and is there any intention to back off, not invade presumably if it's a cease-fire there wouldn't be an invasion, but what about the blockade? what about opening access to gaza? >> hello, andrea. always good to be back. i can't go into many details but what i can say is prime minister netanyahu responded to a request from president obama to agree to the cease-fire which as you said will go into an effect in an hour or so and that -- and that israel will continue to reserve the right to take whatever means are necessary to defend itself, should hamas resume firing at our citizens. we have long-term interests and goals which include not only the cessation of the firing that has gone over the last week,
east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank
mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting
, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it r will it be secular or islamic? they fear it's heading towards theorocracy like iran. >> are people harp pending back to mubarak days when things lasted, i don't know, three decades? >> look it, people have known in this country they've known power grabs, military coos, assassinations and nothing but that. so, of course, that's the baseline that they go on. there's a real fear amongst all of those people who are not muslim brotherhood that morsi is going to use their power, at least some would suggest paranoid about it, they are
. >> white house criticizing president morsi. would you say that was incorrect statement? >> i would say that we are concerned about it and raised those concerns are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may
efforts attacked the offices of president mohamed morsi's freedom and justice party. the political wing of the muslim brotherhood. demonstrators are angry at president morsmorsi's latest decision, one that's reverting the country to a dictatorship. >> we want a contry of institutions, not symbolized in one person who makes all decisions and nobody can say no. >> reporter: morsi's decree gave him legislative powers and extended the time to write a new constitution by two months. morsi's decisions are beyond judicial challenge and dismissed the attorney general. now the attorney general backed by the country's powerful judges, many appointed by former dictator hosni mubarak, are fighting back. they have called for a nationwide strike in the courtrooms. president morsi and other islamist parties have blamed egypt's judiciary for blocking key reforms. it's why president morsi on friday told his mainly islamic supporters he issued the sweeping decree and why many across the country are backing his decision. >> translator: the president's decisions are good, and we support him. he's working h
morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee reacting to susan rice's statements. >> i very much appreciate the transparency and type of conversations
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